• Bags For Ghana Our innovative Micro-Loan program Here's how it works: We collect gently used items here in the US We ship them to Ghana in a container We help the Ghanaians set up shop to sell the gently-used items They pay us for the items sold, and but more to sell First we teach business strategies... Then we invest financially into a start-up business.
  • Our Medical-Mission Teams To date, ODI has coordinated medical short-term trips in which our medical teams have treated over 6,000 patients and our dental teams have provided 3,500 dental patients with fluoride and extraction when needed Our medical teams have greatly impacted lives in the community. Here are a few stories shared by our team members: Bruiser (a name given to a four-year-old by our team) was seen as an emergency case in 2012 because of an infected carotid gland. The doctor with our team told us the boy probably only had a week to live. Every day, for four days, our doctor worked to drain Bruiser’s infection. By day three, the team was already seeing a difference in this little one. Each year when we return we see Bruiser running through the streets, greeting our medical team. He knows. His family knows. And we know that he is here today, celebrating many more birthdays, because our doctor was in the village. During our 2013 trip, we encountered an elderly lady in the village who had suffered a stroke. She was sent home by the hospital and doctors in Ghana with no hope. She couldn’t talk, couldn’t’ swallow, couldn’t walk – she was dying because of a lack of hope. Our therapist saw her and wanted to help. She encouraged the family to sing songs to her, those that she had sung to her children when they were young. This stroke victim began to feebly smile and began humming and mouthing the words to Ghanaian folk tunes. The therapist tied a belt around her waist and began to show the family how they could help her walk. Just by turning her neck to one side our angel (therapist) showed the family how they could get their loved one to swallow. You wouldn’t believe the celebration of the family at that time – it was a miracle. Michael was seventeen when our team saw him in 2012 for a spinal cord injury. Michael had no use of his arms and could barely walk. He had been sent home by the doctors and hospital—with no hope or help. Our medical teams started showing him exercises to help him walk and talk, just a little. With exercise they were able to get his arms moving so he could feed himself. Michael’s dream was to be able to dress and feed himself. For three years, our ODI team returned and worked with Michael. When the team arrived in 2014 Michael was able to walk into the clinic himself. He is now able to both dress and feed himself. His smile has improved greatly! His mother’s smile is a grateful reminder that her son, by the touch of our medical team, has a future where he once was pronounced as “no hope.”
  • Fish Farm Project One of ODI's first community-based projects is a fish farm in Adagya, Central Ghana. There is a great need for creating a food source for villages in Ghana as well as a source of sustainable income. The agrarian/fish farm project will serve as a vocational training resource and commercial endeavor. This project is a great fit for the region as there is a natural stream running through the village. ODI will provide training in basic business planning and the capital necessary to begin and sustain the project until it generates enough revenue to become a selfsustaining enterprise. Eventually, the agrarian project will include a community garden. ODI's first collaboration is with leaders in Adagya, a village community with a population of about 3,000 that has provided land for this project. Adagya is located in the central, Ashanti region of Ghana. This community is also providing the much needed labor to begin and finish this project. Adagya is a very poor community with little access to improvement resources. The chief and elders cite the lack of employment and literacy as two of the greatest unmet needs of their community. This first project in Adagya will serve as a model for other communities. To date ODI has five ponds (each about the size of a football field) and are on our third cycle of fish. Our goal is to have several cycles of fish maturing at the same time. When the fish ponds reach a suitable cash flow, the revenue will be divided in the following ways: one-third to support the fish farm expenses, one-third to help with village expenses such as desks for the public school that serves 600 children and other infrastructure, and one-third will be used to develop another enterprise in a nearby village. This process then enables Ghana to invest in solutions for alleviating poverty. Because of ODI's fish farm we are: Taking a once useless piece of land and producing a product for sale Developing our employees, specifically two who are being mentored as leaders Being recognized by the government of Ghana for our work Being visited by the Republic of Benin to learn about our fish farm In addition, our knowledge on project development and fish farming is growing so we can replicate both the project and process. Two of our employees, Earnest and Mathias, have been with us since 2011. We have watched them grow from "rebel rousers" in the village to upstanding citizens taking care of their families and showing responsible behavior in their communities, their churches, and within their extended family. We are so proud of what these young men have accomplished. They are not where they are because we preached but rather because we showed them kindness and dignity and are willing to walk beside them rather than in front of or pushing from behind.
  • We have just been granted 45,000 acres and are going to be developing it for the locals